Carbon Monoxide Threat

BYRON DUERKSEN, ACI, CMI, CPI

ASHI CERTIFIED INSPECTOR,
NACHI CERTIFIED PROFESSIONAL INSPECTOR
CERTIFIED THERMOGRAPHER

707.245.7545 (cell) or 707.987.9970 (office)



God Bless America!

 

It is imperative to have a professional certified home inspection to reveal any possibility of a carbon monoxide leak.

Heating systems, venting, distribution systems, cooling systems, energy sources and connections.  The availability of outside combustion air and venting systems is extremely important.  Although HVAC units and water heaters are vital to your comfort, they are also potentially lethal. CARBON MONOXIDE IS THE NUMBER ONE CAUSE OF ACCIDENTAL POISONING IN THE U.S.

GOVERNOR SIGNS CARBON MONOXIDE BILL

SACRAMENTO – On Friday, Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger signed Senate Bill 183 into law, requiring that alarm devices be installed in California’s existing single-family homes by mid-2011

This legislation brings the Golden State in-line with other states and municipalities nationwide that have enacted laws to help protect residents from carbon monoxide(CO) poisoning including New York, Minnesota and Illinois.

Televison ads have started that bring the importance of this issue to every viewers attention.  Carbon Monoxide is a silent and frequent killer.  Often adults get violently ill and get help in time to survive while smaller children succumb more quickly.  It is the cause of heartbreak for many a parent who survives while loosing their children.

Claiming hundreds of lives each year, CO is the number one cause of accidental poisoning in the United States. Colorless and odorless, carbon monoxide is virtually impossible to detect without a CO alarm. A 2009 study conducted by First Alert revealed that nearly half (47 percent) of U.S. households are not equipped with these lifesaving devices. The California Air Resources Board also sites “avoidable deaths” each year in California due to unintentional CO poisoning.

PETALUMA RESIDENTS SICKENED BY CARBON MONOXIDE IN HOME

By MARTIN ESPINOZA

THE PRESS DEMOCRAT
A faulty or improperly ventilated heating appliance caused four occupants in a Petaluma home on St. Anthony Lane to become temporarily ill from carbon monoxide poisoning, fire officials said.

Units from the Petaluma fire department arrived at the home, on the 1100 block of St. Anthony Lane., at 9:20 p.m., five minutes after receiving the call of a possible gas problem.

Firefighters immediately detected high levels of carbon monoxide inside the residence using a hand-held gas monitor. The natural gas line was then turned off.

The four occupants, two adults and two children, began to feel better once they were outside. But officials said they were taken to a local hospital for further evaluation.

The home was ventilated by firefighters until air readings were back to normal. Other occupants in the residence were not home at the time.

PG&E arrived to investigate the problem. It was determined that the cause of the leak was a gas-powered furnace in the house that was not ventilated properly.

A PG&E crew determined that the residence was safe for occupants to stay in for the night as long as the furnace was not used until it was properly repaired or replaced.

According to PG&E's Web site, carbon monoxide is a dangerous gas that you cannot smell or see. It is produced as a common by-product of burning fossil fuels. These by-products are usually safe with proper ventilation.

But inadequate oxygen in the burning process or improper ventilation can increase carbon monoxide production to dangerous levels. Common sources of carbon monoxide include gasoline engines running in closed garages, fuel space heaters or water heaters with improper venting and blocked chimneys or vent pipes.

Call Housecheck Inspections to make sure this serious area is not overlooked.